Product Introspection: Outerwear FW20

20.12.15

Dissertations

0120205013014 PARATROOPER COAT (NY/C)

For several seasons now, we have been experimenting with the process of garment-dyeing nylon fabrics. After a series of trial-and-error tests throughout the years, our studies have matured our understanding of various techniques and practices.

We have always been fond of the rugged strength and masculine character present in vintage utility and military garments and wondered if it were possible to express those traits in modern-day wear.

As the given terms suggest, 'utility' or 'military' clothes are manufactured with an emphasis on functionality and durability. Materials and components are therefore positioned according to the application, often creating layers within one garment. Worn and used over a long period of time, the characteristics of each parts' specific fabric tends to age, change, and express itself differently - we think this is what overall creates a product's unique appeal.

0120205013014 PARATROOPER COAT (NY/C)

0120205013014 PARATROOPER COAT (NY/C)

Relating this the nylon materials we have developed; we purposely use multiple compositions within a single product. Differing compositions will, in turn, require different dyeing methods, hence each part and composition is carefully considered to stay true to the intended design. Finalizing our products, they are overdyed in mud from the Amami islands, uniquely rich in iron and minerals from bacteria and volcanic activity in the area.

When acknowledging how bacteria exists on a different time axis from ours, and by allowing it to add the final touches on our products; we can obtain beauty and depth only partially controllable, hence achieve a different character in each and every product we make.

Coat: 0120205013014 PARATROOPER COAT (NY/C), Knit: 0120205012001 AMPLUS HOODIE HAND-KNIT (N.D.), Cut&Sew: 0120205010023 JUMBO HENLEY S/S, Pants: 0120205008004 GIFFORD PANTS DMGD, Bag: 0120203003034 MARKET BAG (L) (FR L), Footwear: 0220901001004 SKAGWAY HI G.PATTEN *F.I.L. INDIGO CAMPING TRAILER EXCLUSIVE

0120205013014 PARATROOPER COAT (NY/C)

Introducing our new oversized coat that which combines elements from military-style jackets and a parachute/life vest combined.
From the main fabric to each detail, the nylon materials utilized have varying appearance finishes after the garment-dyeing process, by the difference in fabric weave and composition.

These color irregularities of each nylon fabric form layers and create depth to a single garment to be enjoyed.

0120205013012 CHAMDO FISHTAIL PARKA (C/NY)

0120205013012 CHAMDO FISHTAIL PARKA (C/NY)

Our recent fishtail coat silhouette is re-invented this winter adopting elements from our studies of traditional robes. While the Tibetan folk costume and Western mod-adopted parka designs were born from different eras and purposes, at a first glance they would seem to have nothing in common; however, both serve originally as utilitarian garments, to protect from extreme cold weather conditions.

Through our perspective, we thought it would create something aesthetically interesting yet practical to enjoy.

Jacket: 0120205013012 CHAMDO FISHTAIL PARKA (C/NY), Cut&Sew: 0120205010016 JUMBO HOODIE P.O. CRASH *F.I.L. EXCLUSIVE, Cut&Sew: 0120205009004 SUBLIG CREW 3-PACK S/S (WIDE), Pants: 0120205008003 CAMUS BRACES PANTS WD, Footwear: 0120202002002 CORDA-FOLK, Cap: 0120203003014 HUNTERS FLAP CAP

Over the decades, I've asked myself why, as a Japanese, I wore vintage American and French work clothes but seldom work clothes from my native country. Japan has a great and wonderful archive in its history; rags, lost clothes and kimonos - so why doesn't anyone wear them in modern life?

As a designer, I've wondered how I could incorporate and maintain the style and charm of these traditional garments within my current lifetime.

0120205013008 KIYARI COAT (MELTON)

The traditional way of wearing a kimono is considered a little uncomfortable and stiff as if your back was bring stretched. Almost costume-like, I find it a bit like wearing a suit in a formal function. Did people in the Edo period, who wore kimonos as everyday clothes, really wear them that way?
I'm sure that it had to be comfortable to wear and was functional and easy to move around for everyday life. Besides, Japanese people of an older era were thinner but not as tall as those of today. Men's kimonos had a peculiarly oversized look, the collar was missing to expose the neckline - perhaps to make the body look bigger and emphasize masculine character? If you consider it that way, don't you think it fits in with the modern-day style in some way?

If we try to preserve these cultural objects simply on the basis that they are important traditions or cultures, I suppose they will not remain. I think it is important not to simply accept what has been handed down to us, but to continue to modify it, to adapt it to the times and to the environment, and to let it exist naturally in our daily lives. Nowadays, I see a younger generation often wearing kimono and haori in the city streets, or even at fashion weeks - in the future, it would be great if eventually there was one in every wardrobe.

Coat: 0120205013008 KIYARI COAT (MELTON), Jacket: 0120205013027 KIVA BLAZER (W/L), Shirt: 0120205011003 HEMI SHIRT L/S, Pants: 0120205008015 ANTON SUSPENDER PANTS (W/L), Footwear: 0120201001003 SKAGWAY HI G.PATTEN

0120205013008 KIYARI COAT (MELTON)

The idea originated to create a wool coat as if I were a kimono craftsman during the Edo period who observed a Western man wearing a coat and wanted to experiment making something similar but with basic kimono design.

Melton fabric is usually shrunk or brushed after weaving to make it flat and easy to sew, however, we've deliberately omitted these processes and used it in a raw state. We believe that by taking a high-quality material like wool and finishing it so rough and uneven that you can almost smell the oil off the loom; you'll appreciate a uniquely dry and primitive look and feel inherent of wool.

0120205013026 ASCOT CONOID JKT SANTOME

0120205013026 ASCOT CONOID JKT SANTOME

Akin to the design approach story of our KIYARI COAT, imagining myself as a kimono artisan, I created a flat-patterned jacket with a collar and lapels, emulating a western-cut suit.
Painted images of swallows and our motif "PEERLESS" found hidden in the lining have been each drawn by hand, per piece by a craftsman artist.

During the Edo period (1603-1867), sumptuary laws (which banned exhibiting extravagance) were imposed, wealthy city dwellers used to enjoy luxury by hiding beautiful designs and patterns on the lining of their garments whilst outwitting the shogunate.

0120205013026 ASCOT CONOID JKT SANTOME

0120205013026 ASCOT CONOID JKT SANTOME

Jacket: 0120205013026 ASCOT CONOID JKT SANTOME, Shirt: 0120205011010 CONOID L/S DMGD, Pants: 0120205008006 FLUXUS 14 SERGE CRASH, Footwear: 0120202002006 HAMMOND-FOLK, Hat: 0120203003017 VIN COWBOY HAT

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