My Archive Vol.2

18.05.22

Dissertations

Panel session (Mar 31 '18)

トークイベント(Mar 31 '18)

Ide:
First, I'd like to thank everyone for gathering here today. The purpose of this exhibition is to showcase the various items introduced throughout Mr. Hiroki Nakamura's monthly series, "My Archive," which has been published in POPEYE magazine for over six years, starting in June of 2012, and is set to be published as its own book. This monthly column began when Mr. Kinoshita was appointed as the editor-in-chief of POPEYE, and will end with this year's May issue, when he will step down from this role. What led to the beginning of this series?

Kinoshita:
I worked in the editorial department of BRUTUS before coming to POPEYE, which is when I first met Mr. Nakamura, and I became curious not only about his brand, visvim, but also about him. So, when I started working at POPEYE, I consulted Mr. Nakamura about working together on a series geared towards our young readers. Of course I was interested in his clothing designs, but I wondered if we could focus instead on his personal stories behind each creation and told him "I wanted to know more about what he was interested in at the moment." In response, he proposed a rough concept of what he wanted to do, and that marked the beginning of the series.

井出:
みなさん、今日はお集まりいただきありがとうございます。今回の展示は、雑誌『ポパイ』2012年の6月から6年間にわたり続いた中村ヒロキさんの連載『My Archive』の単行本化に併せ、そこで取り上げた品々を中心に公開するものです。この連載は、木下さんが『ポパイ』編集長に就任した際に始まり、また同職を退任された今年の5月号で終了となりました。連載が始まったきっかけはどのようなものだったんでしょうか。

木下:
僕は『ポパイ』をやり始める前は、『ブルータス』編集部にいたんですが、その頃に中村さんと知り合って、〈visvim〉というブランドだけでなく、中村さん自身に対してもとても興味を持ったんですね。それで、自分が『ポパイ』を始める時に、若い読者に向けて中村さんと一緒にできることはないですかと相談させてもらいました。もちろん中村さんの作る服に興味がありましたが、その服が生まれる前の、"素"になる話ができないかと考え、「中村さんが今、興味のあることを知りたい」という話をしたと思います。それを受けて、中村さんから「こういうのはどうでしょう」と提案をいただき、連載が始まりました。

Nakamura:
That's right. We agreed to talk about the things that had given me inspiration during my design process. We got together once every 2-3 months, where I prepared each item individually and we sat down for a chat while looking over them. It was a really enjoyable time for me. It's really interesting seeing all of the items on display here today, and it takes me back to all the new things we discovered along the way. I was able to look at things I already knew from a different angle and which provided me with new perspectives. I think that this act of gathering things itself invites that sort of rediscovery.

中村:
そうですね。普段、自分がものづくりする上でインスピレーションを得ているものについてお話をしましょう、と。2〜3ヶ月に1回くらいのペースで集まって、ひと品ずつものを用意して、それを眺めながら雑談みたいな感じでトークする。僕にとって楽しい時間でした。今回、こうやって改めてそれらをディスプレイしてみて、「これってこんな感じだったっけ」とか、新たな発見があって楽しかったですね。知っているものも違う角度から見ることができて、新しいパースペクティブを与えてくれるというか。そもそも、こういうものを集める行為自体が、そうした気づきを求めているからなんですよね。

Kinoshita:
The National Museum of Ethnology located in Osaka houses something similar to these where various handicrafts and folk art pieces from around the world are displayed. It's a very interesting museum filled with a vast number of exhibited works, but have you ever had the chance to visit it Mr. Nakamura?

Nakamura:
No, I haven't yet.

Kinoshita:
After about one year had passed since the series started, I became fascinated with Mr. Nakamura's collection, and realized they were quite a different variety from the items displayed at the National Museum of Ethnology. I think that the items in the museum are all historic, valuable and rare, but to me, Mr. Nakamura's collection felt much more personal. To me it felt as though the items chosen by Mr. Nakamura expressed what he was interested in at that moment rather than placing the focus on their value in the world. Typically in an "archive exhibition," one may think that only a limited number of items would be gathered and displayed, but what makes this exhibition unique is that it feels more like a collection of extremely personal items.

木下:
こうした世界中のさまざまな民芸品、フォークアート的なものを集めて展示している場所に、大阪の「みんぱく(国立民族学博物館)」がありますよね。膨大な数の品があってとても面白い場所ですが、中村さんは行かれたことありますか?

中村:
いや、ないですね。

木下:
連載を始めてから一年間くらい経った頃、中村さんのコレクションの面白さって、やっぱり「みんぱく」にあるものとは違う種類ものだなと気づいたんです。みんぱくに所蔵されているものはもちろん歴史的にも価値があって貴重なものだと思いますが、中村さんのコレクションはとてもパーソナル。世の中において価値のあるものよりも、中村さんが今、興味を持っているものはこういうものなんだよ、というのがとてもよく伝わってくる。「アーカイブ展」というと、すごく稀少なものを集めて公開する、みたいに思われがちかも知れませんが、何だかすごく個人的なものが集まったなという感じがして、それが面白かったですね。

Ide:
I agree. Mr. Nakamura's collection spans a wide range of countries and generations, and many of them cannot be grouped into a category of standard antiques. In fact, many of the items would not be recognized as having significant value as an antique. Among the exhibited items was a vessel made in the United Kingdom featuring an imitation Imari-style design (porcelain made during the Edo period.) This is essentially a "fake" item, so when looking at it from the perspective of the value of an antique that is recognized as an original item, it is practically valueless.

井出:
そうですね。中村さんのコレクションは国や時代が多岐に渡っていて、通常の骨董のカテゴリーでは捉えきれないようなものが多く、一般的に骨董的な価値が認められていないようなものも少なくありません。今回、展示されているもので、日本の古伊万里(江戸時代の有田焼)を模して当時のイギリスで作られた器がありましたね。こういうものは言わば「フェイク」ですから、オリジナルであることに価値を認める一般的な骨董の価値観からすれば、ほとんど価値がないわけですね。

Nakamura:
Yes, that may be true. It only cost about six pounds, if I remember correctly.

Ide:
I think that is what makes your collection so appealing, the fact that you are not hung up on this existing value system, what kind of things do you look at when selecting your items? Do you have some sort of criteria that you follow?

中村:
そうかも知れません。値段も確か6ポンドくらいだったんですよね。

井出:
そうした既成の価値体系にとらわれていないところが、中村さんのコレクションの魅力だと思いますが、ご自身はものを選ぶときにどういった部分を見ているんでしょう。何か基準のようなものはありますか。

Nakamura:
I think that anyone experiences a feeling of, "there's something I like about this," when looking at something, and there are times when certain items get caught up in your own "filter." And everyone has their own unique filters that are different from others. This feeling does not necessarily come from the fact that a specific item is collected by many people, or that it is worth a lot of money. So what triggers that feeling inside myself? Thinking about that can help serve as a hint when creating something new. Some kind of inspiration must have existed when these items were made as well, right? And that's what I try to imagine on my own. For example, if I see a vessel with a fish pattern on it, I would think, "what kind of fish did the creator look at when drawing this?" By continuing to collect and think about items in this manner, it helps to activate my own filter.

中村:
どんな人でも、何かを見た時に「これ、何かいいなあ」と感じる、自分の"フィルター"に引っかかることがあると思うんです。みんなそれぞれ違うフィルターを持っているはずで。それは多くの人が集めているからとか、高額なものだから良いと感じるということではない。では、何が自分の中で引っかかっているのか。それを考えていくことが、新しいものを作るときのヒントになります。これらのものが作られた際にもおそらくきっと、何かインスピレーションのようなものが存在したわけですよね。それを自分なりに想像してみるんです。例えば、魚が描いてある器を見たら、「これは何の魚をみて描いたんだろう?」とかね。それで、こうやってものを集めて、考えることで自分のフィルターを活発にしていくんです。

Ide:
There are many handmade items, items that have been naturally dyed or were made using traditional methods in your collection, but not all of them necessarily fit into that same category. There are many items here that were made with machines, including cars and motorcycles. Does this mean that you weren't thinking about "only collecting handicrafts" from the start?

井出:
中村さんのコレクションは、手仕事で作られたものや天然染色など、自然に近い伝統的な技法で作られたものが多いのですが、必ずしもそうしたものばかりでもないですよね。この中には機械で作られたものもたくさんあるし、車やバイクまである。それはやはり、「手工芸のものを集めよう」などと最初から考えているわけではないということですね。

Nakamura:
Yes. As a result of going out and discovering things that triggered my own filter, many of the items just happened to be naturally dyed items or handicrafts. In the beginning, I didn't know about the history behind most of the items as well. As I conducted research while asking myself why I felt attached to specific items, I later discovered that many were naturally dyed. That kind of "information" was typically revealed later on. I'm often asked whether "I make things in order to preserve traditional manufacturing techniques," or "if I make things using natural methods in order to preserve the environment," but I never thought of it like that. I just want to make things that will stand the test of time and remain in peoples' hearts, so first I like to think about what resonates with me, and I use that as inspiration to make new things.

Kinoshita:
Well the people who made the items on display here probably didn't naturally dye them in order to preserve the environment. However, when I look at these Native American moccasins lined up here, it almost seems strange that the people of that era applied such fine workmanship into their everyday tools. Was the aesthetic conscious of these people from the past that high? Mr. Nakamura, why do you think these kinds of items were made?

中村:
そうですね、自分のフィルターに引っかかるものを探していったら、結果的に手工芸とか天然染色とかのものが多くなったというだけで。これらも最初はどういう来歴のものか知らなかったですからね。何でこれは良いと感じるんだろう?と思って調べて行ったら、それが天然染色だった、と。そういう"情報"は後から付いてきたものなんですね。だから、「伝統的な技術を残すためにものづくりしているのか」とか「環境保護のために自然に近い技法で作っているのか」と訊かれたりすることがよくあるんですが、僕はそういう風に考えたことがなくて。とにかく長く残っていくもの、人の心に残るものを作りたいなと思っているので、まず自分の心に刺さるものは何かを考えて、そのインスピレーションからものづくりをしていきたいんですね。

木下:
おそらくここに展示されてあるものを作った当時の人たちも、環境保護のために天然染色をしていたわけではないですもんね。だけど、そこに並べられたネイティブ・アメリカンのモカシンなんかを見ていると、昔の人たちが日常の道具にこんなに細かい細工を施していたというのが、不思議に思えてきます。昔の人の美意識がすごく高かったのか、どうなのか。中村さんは、こういうものがなぜ作られたと思いますか?

Nakamura:
Well, if you continue to delve into it, I think that it comes down to "craving attention." For example, we made a special space where we exhibited Native American conchos, but these items were originally made by Native Americans to attach to their medicine bags after seeing the rivets attached to the boxes brought in from Europe around the time Europeans and Native Americans started to trade with each other. I think there was an honest sense of wanting to "dress up" and "wearing different things than others to get the attention of your peers" with an underlying desire "to be loved."

中村:
うーん、そこをずっと掘り下げていくと、やっぱり「アテンションが欲しい」ということなのかなと。例えば、今回、ネイティブ・アメリカンの人たちが作ったコンチョを展示したスペースを作りましたが、これはもともとヨーロッパの人々とネイティブ・アメリカンとの間で交易が行われるようになってから、ヨーロッパから持ち込まれた箱などにリベットが付いているのを見たネイティブの人々が、自分たちのメディスンバッグなどに付け始めたりしたものだろうと思います。そこにはやっぱり「着飾りたい」とか、「人と違うものを身につけて、仲間からのアテンションが欲しい」とかいう素直な気持ちがあって、その根底にはやっぱり「愛されたい」という願いがあったんじゃないでしょうか。

Ide:
I see. However, I think both people from the past and people today share that feeling of "wanting to be loved." If that's the case, why do we feel such beauty in these kinds of old items?

Nakamura:
I think that you can feel that in both items from the past and items from today. However, old items are preserved as archives for long periods of time and have accumulated over the years. There were also a wider number of options compared to modern items. Also, compared to modern items, older items were not made for commercial purposes, so the messages of "wanting others to look at you" or "wanting to be popular" are conveyed in a more direct manner. There were no fashion shows and people telling you what the latest trends were, so it completely removed any artificial biases. I think that the simpler the message is, the clearer and stronger it is. From a commercial perspective, obviously we run a business by making and selling products, but personally, I initially think solely about what I want to do and what I want to make, and it's not only about business. I think of it as a process that starts with an inspiration that leads the desire to make something beautiful and long-lasting, and then thinking about how to connect that to a business in order to make that idea a reality. When you reverse this process, and think solely about the business side and then make something that fits those needs, it will change your final product. That's why I think that it's important to connect your personal feelings, like making something that you would want to wear or think is beautiful, with the market. Mr. Kinoshita, what are your views on this idea?

井出:
なるほど。ただ、「愛されたい」という気持ちは、現代の人も昔の人も変わらず持っていると思うんですよね。であれば、なぜこうした古いものが美しく感じるんでしょう。

中村:
きっとそうした部分は、古いものだけじゃなくて、現代のものにもあると思うんですよね。ただ、古いものはアーカイブとして時間の積み重ねがあって、数も多いですから。また現代のものよりも選択肢は広い。あと、古いものの多くは現代に比べてコマーシャルなものづくりではないので、「誰かに見てもらいたい」とか「モテたい」とかいうメッセージがダイレクトですよね。ファッションショーが行われて、今年のトレンドはこうで......みたいな人工的なバイアスがない。そうしたシンプルなメッセージほど、クリアで強いと思うんです。コマーシャルという面では、もちろん僕らもプロダクトを作って売っているので、ビジネスではあるんですけども、僕はやっぱり最初に何をやりたいか、何を作りたいかということがあって、先にビジネスがあるのではないんですね。ものづくりに繋がるインスピレーションがあり、美しいもの、長く残るものを作りたいという思いがあって、それを実現するために、どうビジネスに結びつけるかという風に考える。その過程を逆にして、ビジネスを真っ先に考えて、それに見合ったものを作っていく、という順番で考えてしまうと、生み出されるものが変わってしまいます。だから、本当に自分が着たいとか、素敵だなとかいう思い、パーソナルな感情を、マーケットに接続していくことが大切だと思っています。そのあたり、木下さんはどう考えていらっしゃいますか。

Kinoshita:
I absolutely agree with you. I think that it's especially important to grasp what your objective is in the beginning. I think that for Mr. Nakamura, he has continued to work with the desire to express his tastes to others, and for myself, I had the desire to create a magazine that people would enjoy. Both of our starting points were different from the idea of solely wanting to sell a lot of products and make money. However, in order to make this happen, you also have to think about how you're going to make it into a business at the same time. I think that this is important in terms of how things work in today's world, but I also believe that it's essential to not forget about initial intentions throughout the process. I love that my own views on this concept relates with the products Mr. Nakamura creates, as well as his own views.

木下:
僕もその話は大賛成ですね。やっぱり最初に自分たちの目的が何なのかっていうところが、すごく重要な気がして。中村さんだったら、自分がいいと思う服を人に伝えたいとか、僕だったら面白い雑誌を読んでもらいたいっていう思いがあって、仕事をしてきた。とにかくたくさん売りたいとか、お金儲けをしたいとかという考え方とは違う出発点から始まっていると思うんですよね。ただそれを成立させるためには、ビジネスとしてどうすべきかということも同時に考えないといけない。それは今の世の中の仕組みの中では大事なことなんですけど、やっぱり初期衝動みたいなところを忘れないでやるってことがすごく重要なんだなという気がしていて。そういう部分が、僕が中村さんが作っているものや考えていることに共感するところ、好きなところなんですよね。

edit&text: Kosuke Ide

Takahiro Kinoshita
Former editor-in-chief of POPEYE magazine. Born in 1968. After serving as an associate editor and fashion chief for BRUTUS, he was appointed as the editor-in-chief of POPEYE in 2012. He stepped down from the position as of March 2018. In May 2018, he was appointed as an executive officer at Fast Retailing Co., Ltd.

木下孝浩
『POPEYE』元編集長。1968年生まれ。『BRUTUS』副編集長兼ファッションチーフを経て、2012年より『POPEYE』編集長へ。同職は2018年3月をもって退任。2018年5月に株式会社ファーストリテイリングの執行役員に就任。

Kosuke Ide
Editor. Born in 1975. After serving as an associate editor for travel magazine PAPERSKY, he started conducting freelance work. He currently serves as an editor and writer for "Tsubasa no Oukoku" (Wingspan), the inflight magazine of ANA Group, as well as a collection of mooks, books and online publications. He was in charge of the editing for "My Archive" since its inception.

井出幸亮
編集者。1975年生まれ。旅行誌『PAPERSKY』副編集長を経てフリーランスに。雑誌『BRUTUS』『POPEYE』『翼の王国』ほか、ムック、書籍、webその他で編集・執筆活動中。『My Archive』では連載当初から編集を担当。

SHARE: